If you missed Part 1, you can get that here!

Ok, so just some random thoughts from my notes on the episode:
1. When I die, I want to be reincarnated with Susan Simpson’s hearing. Her children will never be able to murmur under their breath.

2. Listening to Jay tell this story is like trying to interpret hieroglyphs or do calculus.

3. I had no idea how much I loved and missed Christina Guiterrez’s random outbursts until I heard her scream about Jen. Why did she not bring that passion to all her questions ?

On with the show. My three reasons why I knew Jay was coerced.

1. Sadly, this is an old story retold

So I shared my lack of surprise to find out Jay had been coached here. Why?  Having heard the type of person he was ( I. E.  “Black Dennis Rodman” punk rocker etc) I drew a quick profile in my mind. I was once a kid like Jay, too black to fit in with the white kids, too white for the black kids. This is someone who wants to fit in. He pretends to be this badass rebel without a cause. As I listened to his testimony it took me back to the Central Park Five’s testimony  in the documentary about their case (Ken Burns: The Central Park Five can be viewed here on Amazon Prime. It’s an affiliate link! ). That was another case in which young minority men were manipulated by the police to make up a version of a crime that NEVER HAPPENED. Watch this doc then listen to Jay Wilds testify and tell me you can’t see the parallels.

2. The detectives in charge were known to be crooked

The detectives were KNOWN scoundrels. The department had too many cases on the books. Public outcry was mounting. When your job is on the line even good people can do the wrong thing and justify it by believing they are taking a shortcut to the right outcome. The lead detective on the Adnan Syed case was the same detective who retired amidst allegations that he had coerced witnesses to give false testimony in another case of false imprisonment. Don’t miss this great 2007 article in which Ritz was named, titled “Who’s the Best at Closing Cases?”

3. Jay Wilds was arrested prior to his “confession” on a minor offense. BEFORE the police spoke with Jen.

Yes, it’s true. January 27, 1999. Two weeks after Hae’s murder. He was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. All of a sudden he got very cooperative, didn’t he? Anybody besides me think they know why?

I don’t want to belabor the point here. We can go over tons and tons of details, but the point is this: the State’s case has NEVER EVER MADE SENSE. Why? Because fairy tales don’t have to. Fact is often stranger than fiction, and here we have another instance where that holds true. The only thing we have to wait on now is Jay Wilds. Will we ever know the real deal with Jay?
Until next time,

René

P. S. Episode 4 recap is available now

  

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